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Luis Coronel

Desfile de Éxitos 3/28/15

luis coronel

You’d be excused for thinking the charts are dormant this week — the same #1’s, mostly the same top 10’s, “Bailando” has always been at war with “Propuesta Indecente,” etc. — but look beneath the filthy snow and there are signs of life. For one thing, NorteñoBlog will never complain about an accordion ballad reaching the Hot Latin top 10, even when that ballad is as lifeless as Calibre 50’s “Contigo.” True, this particular song might not push my buttons, but anything that helps squeeze out one of King Romeo’s romantic bellows is fine by me. (i.e., Adios to “Eres Mia,” only a year old.)

For another, some decent songs are muscling their way up. The Pick to Click is “Nota de Amor,” a pretty piano/accordion reggaeton love note by Wisin, Carlos Vives, and Daddy Yankee. It’s got the same chord changes as the Black Eyed Peas’ “Where Is the Love?,” though I didn’t detect any lines comparing the CIA to the KKK. We noted last week that the puro Chihuahua sax of La Maquinaria Norteña is awesome, and their “Si Te Vuelvo a Ver” is getting more radio play. And wonder of wonders, Tuscon’s teen tenor Luis Coronel is charting with a song that doesn’t suck! “Cuando La Miro” is some fairly likable magic changes bullshit. Coronel can barely keep up with it, but he knows how to put across wide-eyed eagerness.

All that plus Pitbull! NorteñoBlog will also never complain about the presence of Pitbull. And not just on the charts — in public and semi-public spaces. Even if Pitbull set up a Sheets Energy Strips display inside a funeral home and cornered NorteñoBlog, NorteñoBlog would just end up buying a bunch of energy strips and handing them out to the bereaved because, you know, it’s Pitbull. He could charm the rigor off of rigor mortis and/or Marco Rubio.

These are the top 25 Hot Latin Songs and top 20 Regional Mexican Songs, courtesy Billboard, as published March 28.

1. “El Perdon” – Nicky Jam & Enrique Iglesias
2. “Propuesta Indecente” – Romeo Santos (86 WEEKS OLD)
3. “Ay Vamos” – J Balvin
4. “Bailando” – Enrique ft. Descemer Bueno, Gente de Zona, & the word “contigo” (52 WEEKS OLD! “Feliz cumpleaños contigo…”)
5. “Hablame de Ti” – Banda MS (#6 RegMex) (snoooooozzzzzz)
6. “Mi Verdad” – Maná ft. Shakira
7. “Contigo” – Calibre 50 (#1 RegMex)
8. “Travesuras” – Nicky Jam
9. “Yo También” – Romeo Santos ft. Marc Anthony
10. “El Karma” – Ariel Camacho y Los Plebes del Rancho (#11 RegMex)

11. “Hilito” – Romeo Santos
12. “Lejos De Aqui” – Farruko
13. “Fanatica Sensual” – Plan B
14. “Piensas (Dile La Verdad)” – Pitbull ft. Gente de Zona
15. “Disparo Al Corazon” – Ricky Martin
16. “Eres Una Niña” – Gerardo Ortíz (#9 RegMex)
17. “Soltero Disponible” – Regulo Caro (#2 RegMex)
18. “Dime” – Julión Álvarez y Su Norteño Banda (#8 RegMex)
19. “Juntos (Together)” – Juanes
20. “Lo Hiciste Otra Vez” – La Arrolladora Banda El Limón (#3 RegMex) (Oh dear, this is not good. Not just sap — meandering sap.)

21. “Pierdo la Cabeza” – Zion & Lennox
22. “Mi Vuelvo Un Cobarde” – Christian Daniel
23. “Qué Tiene De Malo” – Calibre 50 ft. El Komander (#18 RegMex)
24. “Nota de Amor” – Wisin + Carlos Vives ft. Daddy Yankee
25. “Mi Princesa” – Remmy Valenzuela (#13 RegMex)

¡Adios!
“Eres Mia” – Romeo Santos (53 WEEKS OLD)
—————–

4. “Levantando Polvadera” – Voz De Mando
5. “El Que Se Enamora Pierde” – Banda Carnaval
7. “Eres Tú” – Proyecto X
10. “No Te Vayas” – Fidel Rueda

12. “Que Aun Te Amo” – Pesado
13. “Se Me Sigue Notando” – Chuy Lizarraga y Su Banda Tierra Sinaloense
14. “Mi Primera Vez” – Jonatan Sánchez
15. “Calla y Me Besas” – Enigma Norteña
16. “Si Te Vuelvo a Ver” – La Maquinaria Norteña
17. “Me Sobrabas Tu” – Banda Los Recoditos
18. “Cuando La Miro” – Luis Coronel
19. “Todo Tuyo” – Banda El Recodo
20. “Bonito Y Bello” – La Septima Banda

¡Adios!
“Y Vete Olvidando” – Javier Rosas
“Entonces Que Somos” – Banda El Recodo (A nada Luciano Luna ballad off Recodo’s 2013 album, now turned into a dramatic short film.)

How Big Is Number 1?

For the past two weeks, regional Mexican music has claimed the #1 spot on Billboard‘s Top Latin Albums chart. Keep in mind, these were two very slow weeks. How slow? Remember the week Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star was the #1 movie in America? THAT slow.

Last week Intocable was on top with their live album XX: 20 Aniversario. The week before was led by Disa’s annual compilation Las Bandas Románticas de America. (Just in time for Valentine’s Day! Wanna role-play a “tryst with the vintner’s daughter” scenario?) We’ve got a stopgap in Intocable’s case and a brazen moneymaker for Disa, neither designed to put new songs into the world. But musical irrelevance isn’t the whole story. Just behind Bandas Románticas was Privilegio, the Sony debut of hotshot corridista Alfredo Olivas. I’d assumed some pent-up hunger for this guy, who’s had multi-million-hit videos and a Triunfo cover. But sales figures reveal otherwise:

The compilation set Las Bandas Romanticas de America 2015 leads the list at No. 1 (over 2,000 units shifted, according to Nielsen Music). The album follows the 2014 edition which spent four weeks at No. 1. Newcomer Alfredo Olivas bows in the No. 2 spot with his first charting album Privilegio, starting with 2,000 copies sold. The singer-songwriter spends a second consecutive week at No. 30 on Regional Mexican Airplay with the set’s lead single “Mi Porvenir,” its peak. The track climbs 11 percent in audience impressions, to 1.5 million, in its sixth week on the chart.

I’d like to say it took a population the size of my podunk hometown to top the Latin Albums chart, but my podunk hometown was more than twice that size. 2,000 people lived in the even podunker town next door. That was the town we all made fun of. 2,000 people is not very many. Intocable didn’t do much better:

Regional Mexican group Intocable scores its seventh No. 1 on Top Latin Albums, as XX Aniversario debuts atop the list with 3,000 sold in the week ending Feb. 1, according to Nielsen Music.

This chart is not always so slow, especially when it comes to fresh-faced crossover prospects. Luis Coronel’s second album debuted to 10,000 copies sold last year, which got him to #33 on the overall Billboard 200. The year before, Gerardo Ortiz moved 14,000 copies of Archivos de Mi Vida in its first week, enough to peak at #68 on the top 200. (A busier week, apparently; he’d peaked higher in the past.) But things are down all over, right? People are setting dubious records left and right. Last April, Pharrell scored the lowest selling No. 2 album in history when he sold 29,000 copies of G I R L. I don’t bring up these low numbers to mock Intocable, Olivas, or Disa’s roster of heartthrobs. It’s just good to have a sense of scale.

Also worth noting: Top Latin Albums measures album sales only, while the top 200 has moved to a new “multi-metric” algorithm, with digital track sales contributing to an album’s placement on the big chart. This is how Enrique’s latest album is the highest Latin album on the top 200, down at #190, without topping the Latin album chart. “Bailando” still going strong! Stream it 1500 times and Enrique gets his wings a sale.

Desfile de Éxitos

Welcome back! Posting dried up due to a spate of year-end list making and turkey cooking, but that’s all over with.

These are the top 25 Hot Latin Songs and top 20 Regional Mexican Songs, courtesy Billboard, as published Nov. 27. Things to note:

The Andy Warhol movie running time chart count for “Propuesta Indecente” increases to 70 weeks. 70! I’m not sure about the stats for genre charts, but that’s longer than “How Do I Live” was in the Hot 100.

We say adiós to “No Me Dolio” by La Original Banda el Limón, and hola to a second song by Calibre 50, “Qué Tiene De Malo” ft. El Komander, already a #1 hit in México and, you’ll remember, written about here. (And one of the best singles of the year, to boot.) In the bottom reaches of the Regional Mexican chart, another hola to Regulo Caro’s new one.

1. “Bailando” – Enrique ft. Descemer Bueno, Gente de Zona, & the word “contigo”
2. “Ay Vamos” – J Balvin
3. “Propuesta Indecente” – Romeo Santos (I just wanna point out this song is 70 WEEKS OLD, and that maybe someone’s chart methodology needs tweaking.)
4. “Eres Mia” – Romeo Santos
5. “No Me Pidas Perdon” – Banda MS (#2 Reg Mex)
6. “Y Asi Fue” – Julión Álvarez (#3 RegMex) (Is this man the best banda singer around right now? Or should we forget the qualifier?)
7. “Travesuras” – Nicky Jam
8. “6 AM” – J Balvin ft. Farruko
9. “Adios” – Ricky Martin
10. “Odio” – Romeo Santos ft. Drake

11. “Tus Besos” – Juan Luis Guerra 440
12. “Hasta Que Salga el Sol” – Banda Los Recoditos (#5 RegMex)
13. “Yo Tambien” – Romeo Santos ft. Marc Anthony
14. “Javier El de Los Llanos” – Calibre 50 (#1 RegMex)
15. “La Bala” – Los Tigres Del Norte (#4 RegMex)
16. “Perdon” – Camila
17. “Plakito” – Yandel ft. El General Gadiel
18. “Eres Una Niña” – Gerardo Ortíz (#11 RegMex) (Hooray!)
19. “Soy El Mismo” – Prince Royce
20. “Levantando Polvadera” – Voz De Mando (#6 RegMex)

21. “Qué Tiene De Malo” – Calibre 50 ft. El Komander
22. “Que Suenen Los Tambores” – Victor Manuelle
23. “Soy Un Desmadre” – Banda Tierra Sagrada ft. Marco Flores y La #1 Banda Jerez (#7 RegMex)
24. “Llegaste Tu” – Luis Fonsi ft. Juan Luis Guerra
25. “El Agüitado” – Jorge Valenzuela (#8 RegMex)

—————–

#9. “Zapatillas Ferragamo” – Meno Lugo
#10. “Mi Princesa” – Remmy Valenzuela

#12. “Tenerte” – Luis Coronel
#13. “Al Estilo Mafia” – Saul El Jaguar ft. La Bandononona Clave Nueva de Max Peraza
#14. “Asi Ya No” – La Maquinaria Norteña
#15. “La Historia De Mis Manos” – Banda Carnaval
#16. “La Indicada” – Kevin Ortíz
#17. “Ahora Por Ley” – Los Huracanes Del Norte
#18. “El Karma” – Ariel Camacho y Los Plebes Del Rancho
#19. “Soltero Disponible” – Regulo Caro
#20. “Me Voy De Ti” – Fidel Rueda

Desfile de Éxitos

romeo210613

These are the top 25 Hot Latin Songs and top 20 Regional Mexican Songs, courtesy Billboard, as published Nov. 13. Things to note:

The sarlaccian digestion chart count for “Propuesta Indecente” increases to 68 weeks. And it moves UP a notch, to #2! You’ll remember this song already hit #1 more than a year ago, at the end of September/beginning of October 2013. King Romeo’s aptly named album Formula Vol. 2 had the biggest debut week (100k) of any Latin album in eight years. Since then he’s played Yankee Stadium and sold out venues in Mexico, the latter of which might be the more impressive feat for a guy from the Bronx. The video’s at 488 million views.

Nothing against “Propuesta”‘s pretty smarm, but its longevity underscores the lack of turnover on these charts. Nobody’s new or gone this week. On the one hand, this makes catching up with the popular music easy — stick around for a few weeks and there’s a good chance you’ll hear all the songs on the radio. On the other hand, we should wonder why the pace of turnover is so glacial. And why “Bailando” is still #1. At least we have “Soy Un Desmadre,” “Eres Una Niña,” and nomenclatural champs Saul El Jaguar ft. La Bandononona Clave Nueva de Max Peraza around to keep things interesante.

1. “Bailando” – Enrique ft. Descemer Bueno, Gente de Zona, & the word “contigo”
2. “Propuesta Indecente” – Romeo Santos (I just wanna point out this song is 68 WEEKS OLD AND CLIMBING, and that maybe someone’s chart methodology needs tweaking.)
3. “Eres Mia” – Romeo Santos
4. “Ay Vamos” – J Balvin
5. “Y Asi Fue” – Julión Álvarez (#1 RegMex) (Is this man the best banda singer around right now? Or should we forget the qualifier?)
6. “No Me Pidas Perdon” – Banda MS (#4 Reg Mex)
7. “Travesuras” – Nicky Jam
8. “6 AM” – J Balvin ft. Farruko
9. “Odio” – Romeo Santos ft. Drake
10. “Hasta Que Salga el Sol” – Banda Los Recoditos (#3 RegMex)

11. “Tus Besos” – Juan Luis Guerra 440
12. “Soy El Mismo” – Prince Royce
13. “Javier El de Los Llanos” – Calibre 50 (#5 RegMex)
14. “La Bala” – Los Tigres Del Norte (#2 RegMex)
15. “Adios” – Ricky Martin
16. “Yo Tambien” – Romeo Santos ft. Marc Anthony
17. “Perdon” – Camila
18. “Lo Poco Que Tengo” – Ricardo Arjona
19. “Eres Una Niña” – Gerardo Ortíz (#17 RegMex) (Hooray!)
20. “Tenerte” – Luis Coronel (#14 RegMex) (Quite a plummet for young Coronel! You hate to see that.)

21. “El Agüitado” – Jorge Valenzuela (#8 RegMex)
22. “Tu Respiracion” – Chayanne
23. “Plakito” – Yandel ft. El General Gadiel (It’s newish!)
24. “Que Suenen Los Tambores” – Victor Manuelle
25. “Soy Un Desmadre” – Banda Tierra Sagrada ft. Marco Flores y La #1 Banda Jerez (#6 RegMex)

—————–

#7. “Ahora Por Ley” – Los Huracanes Del Norte
#9. “Asi Ya No” – La Maquinaria Norteña
#10. “Zapatillas Ferragamo” – Meno Lugo

#11. “Mi Princesa” – Remmy Valenzuela
#12. “Levantando Polvadera” – Voz De Mando
#13. “La Historia De Mis Manos” – Banda Carnaval
#15. “La Indicada” – Kevin Ortíz
#16. “Al Estilo Mafia” – Saul El Jaguar ft. La Bandononona Clave Nueva de Max Peraza
#18. “El Karma” – Ariel Camacho y Los Plebes Del Rancho
#19. “No Me Dolio” – La Original Banda el Limón
#20. “Me Voy De Ti” – Fidel Rueda

Desfile de Éxitos

These are the top 25 Hot Latin Songs and top 20 Regional Mexican Songs, courtesy Billboard, as published Nov. 6. Things to note:

The elephantine gestation chart count for “Propuesta Indecente” increases to 67 weeks.

We say “you’re back!” to Fidel Rueda’s “Me Voy De Ti,” and bid a sad “adios” to “Mi Padrino El Diablo,” La Trakalosa’s Faustian tale of terror. But not to worry! Trakalosa’s labelmates and duet partners Colmillo Norteño have also released “Diablo” as a single.

1. “Bailando” – Enrique ft. Descemer Bueno, Gente de Zona, & the word “contigo”
2. “Eres Mia” – Romeo Santos
3. “Propuesta Indecente” – Romeo Santos (I just wanna point out this song is 67 WEEKS OLD, and that maybe someone’s chart methodology needs tweaking.)
4. “Ay Vamos” – J Balvin
5. “No Me Pidas Perdon” – Banda MS (#4 Reg Mex)
6. “Y Asi Fue” – Julión Álvarez (#1 RegMex) (Is this man the best banda singer around right now? Or should we forget the qualifier?)
7. “Travesuras” – Nicky Jam
8. “Odio” – Romeo Santos ft. Drake
9. “6 AM” – J Balvin ft. Farruko
10. “Hasta Que Salga el Sol” – Banda Los Recoditos (#5 RegMex)

11. “Tus Besos” – Juan Luis Guerra 440
12. “Soy El Mismo” – Prince Royce
13. “La Bala” – Los Tigres Del Norte (#2 RegMex)
14. “Adios” – Ricky Martin
15. “Javier El de Los Llanos” – Calibre 50 (#3 RegMex)
16. “Yo Tambien” – Romeo Santos ft. Marc Anthony
17. “Lo Poco Que Tengo” – Ricardo Arjona
18. “Tu Respiracion” – Chayanne
19. “Perdon” – Camila
20. “Tenerte” – Luis Coronel (#9 RegMex) (Quite a plummet for young Coronel! You hate to see that.)

21. “Como Yo Le Doy” – Pitbull ft. Don Miguelo
22. “Soledad” – Don Omar (It’s new!)
23. “Plakito” – Yandel ft. El General Gadiel (It’s newish!)
24. “El Agüitado” – Jorge Valenzuela (#6 RegMex)
25. “Eres Una Niña” – Gerardo Ortíz (#18 RegMex) (Hooray!)

——

#7. “Soy Un Desmadre” – Banda Tierra Sagrada ft. Marco Flores & La #1 Banda Jerez
#8. “Ahora Por Ley” – Los Huracanes Del Norte
#10. “Zapatillas Ferragamo” – Meno Lugo

#11. “Mi Princesa” – Remmy Valenzuela
#12. “Asi Ya No” – La Maquinaria Norteña
#13. “Levantando Polvadera” – Voz De Mando
#14. “La Historia De Mis Manos” – Banda Carnaval
#15. “Al Estilo Mafia” – Saul El Jaguar ft. La Bandononona Clave Nueva de Max Peraza
#16. “No Me Dolio” – La Original Banda el Limón
#17. “La Indicada” – Kevin Ortíz
#19. “El Karma” – Ariel Camacho y Los Plebes Del Rancho
#20. “Me Voy De Ti” – Fidel Rueda

Album Review: QUIERO SER TU DUEñO by Luis Coronel

luis coronel

Originally posted at PopMatters:

“Sometimes I think the little girls don’t understand a damn thing.”
—Robert Christgau, writing about Duran Duran (who were infinitely better than Luis Coronel)

The debut album from Tucson’s teen tenor Luis Coronel plopped like a wet turd onto the norteño scene a year ago, thanks to Del Records honcho Angel Del Villar, who noticed Coronel selling out small venues and decided to see how far he could go. The answer: pretty far. In 2013 Coronel’s debut album peaked at #2 on Billboard’s Top Latin Albums chart. Since then his videos have amassed millions of views, and he now routinely sells out bigger venues. Billboard chalks his appeal up to “a young bilingual, bicultural and cellphone-clutching teen demographic”, which seems accurate: not only do most people younger than 50 clutch cellphones, but Coronel’s latest video is set in a nuevo-American Graffiti world. In the parking lot of a place called “Bob’s Coffee Shop”, he wears a letter jacket and serenades his chiquitita in Spanish. Real Pat Boone type; Del Villar would’ve been a fool not to sign him.

The problem is, he’s no good. Coronel specializes in ballads so squishy they can slip between your ears while having no measurable effect on your brain. He wants to be yours; he was born to love you; you’re the best thing that’s ever happened to him. He’s the drippy boyfriend so afraid to offend your parents they just wanna kick him out the door. In his song “Tendrás Que Aguantarte”, one of two Coronel originals on his new album Quiero Ser Tu Dueño, he discovers his girlfriend has cheated on him. With a plucky banda patting him on the back, Coronel declares living well the best revenge and actually apologizes to his cheating ex, presumably because she still has to put up with his almost psychotic banality.

Dueño debuted at #1, doubling the first week sales of its predecessor, and indeed it’s twice as good. By which I mean, Con La Frente en Alto contained two listenable songs, and the new album has four. What’s more, the first album contained several songs clearly designed to humiliate young Coronel. Or at least that’s the only way to make any sense of them. At one point he sang a duet with his poised labelmate Nena Guzman, and someone — the smart money’s on producer Manny Ledesma — had the bright idea to make Coronel sing up in her range. Eeeesh. Someone should’ve told him singing flat is not an acceptable form of chivalry.

Coronel sounds marginally better — i.e., not painful — on the new album, but he’s still nobody’s idea of a good singer. He sings like a typical high schooler at a variety show; holding out long notes because he has to, he creates musical black holes from which no personality can escape. When he slides into a melisma, you can practically hear him reading the notes off a piece of sheet music. When people say of a singer, “so-and-so would never make it on American Idol” (or whichever musical reality show they’re insulting), they usually mean that singer is too quirky or subversive or “deep” to be embraced by the masses. Luis Coronel wouldn’t make it because he sounds completely unremarkable.

His best songs are the ones that give his norteño band or brass arrangers opportunities to show off. Indeed, his small recording band is one of the best in the business, a combo of great session players whose names appear on most of the rockingest norteño albums in recent years. (Do I even need to mention Jesse “El Pulpo” Esquivel on bateria?) On Coronel’s last album someone (I blame Ledesma) handed this extraordinary band a bunch of crap ballads to play, which left them floundering a bit. Mario Aguilar’s acordeón, for instance, sounded less “astounding virtuoso” than “bored player tossing off licks to fill the void”. Now, blessed with two bona fide corridos among the crap ballads, these musicians sound snapped back to life, like Marty McFly when his hand suddenly reappears. Granted, among the larger world of corridos “Mi Vida” and “Hermano Mío” are sappy things, respectively recounting Coronel’s hardscrabble origins and how much he loves his brother. Coronel sings both like he’s seeking head pats. That’s another Pat Boone touch: sweetening lascivious genres so easily offended listeners won’t take offense. But with a band this good, the singer’s easy to ignore.

The problem with Coronel isn’t that he’s safe. Banda el Recodo is safe for the whole family, and their music explodes in spasms of joy and excitement, heartbreak and anguish. In Coronel’s music, nothing happens, and then it happens over and over again. And he’s got some big names handing him songs! Luciano Luna, the Diane Warren of the Sierra, wrote Coronel two super generous tunes: the swinging polka “Nací Para Amarte” (sample lyric: “There are so many things that I have to give you”) and first single “Tenerte” (sample lyric: “I hope to give you what you crave”). Both are reliably pretty and pleasant. Neither is the least bit memorable, which is Coronel’s fault as much as Luna’s. Luciano Luna churns out song after song and returns to the same goggle-eyed well for most of them; but usually you remember his hits, like Noel Torres’s “Me Interesas” or Recodo’s “Dime Que Me Quieres”, because their singers find the authority to bring them to life.

Yeah yeah, Coronel’s just a teen heartthrob. But if Latino American teen heartthrobs have taught us anything, it’s that age ain’t nothing but a number and teeniness ain’t no excuse. Norteño’s Jessie Morales, bachata’s Leslie Grace, and pop’s Becky G have rasped, cajoled, sassed, and wiled their ways into people’s lives through sheer force of charisma. Coronel hasn’t got it yet. He’s doing pretty well for himself, but if — as reported in both Billboard and Triunfo — he’s harboring ambitions to cross over into English-language pop, let’s hope he grows into his own songs. He’s got nowhere to go but up.

NO VALE LA PENA

Desfile de Éxitos

Bandononona-clave-nueva

These are the top 25 Hot Latin Songs and top 20 Regional Mexican Songs, courtesy Billboard, as published Oct. 30. Things to note:

The tantric orgasm chart count for “Propuesta Indecente” increases to 66 weeks.

Gerardo Ortiz’s “Eres Una Niña” enters the Top 25 Hot Latin Songs, because ours is a gracious and merciful g-d, and its week-old video has garnered three quarters of a million views.

There is an act (ok, with a “featuring” credit, but still) at #18 RegMex called “Saul ‘El Jaguar’ ft. La Bandononona Clave Nueva de Max Peraza,” which may be the greatest act of musical nomenclature since Turbonegro last titled some songs.

This week we say goodbye to “Sigue” by La Poderosa Banda San Juan, “Me Dejaste Acostumbrado” by La Arrolladora Banda el Limón, and “Me Voy De Ti” by Fidel Rueda. (But in this format, do we ever really say goodbye?)

1. “Bailando” – Enrique ft. Descemer Bueno, Gente de Zona, & the word “contigo”
2. “Eres Mia” – Romeo Santos
3. “Propuesta Indecente” – Romeo Santos (I just wanna point out this song is 66 WEEKS OLD, and that maybe someone’s chart methodology needs tweaking.)
4. “No Me Pidas Perdon” – Banda MS (#2 Reg Mex)
5. “Ay Vamos” – J Balvin
6. “Travesuras” – Nicky Jam
7. “Y Asi Fue” – Julión Álvarez (#4 RegMex) (Is this man the best banda singer around right now? Or should we forget the qualifier?)
8. “Odio” – Romeo Santos ft. Drake
9. “6 AM” – J Balvin ft. Farruko
10. “Hasta Que Salga el Sol” – Banda Los Recoditos (#3 RegMex)

11. “Tus Besos” – Juan Luis Guerra 440
12. “La Bala” – Los Tigres Del Norte (#1 RegMex)
13. “Soy El Mismo” – Prince Royce
14. “Yo Tambien” – Romeo Santos ft. Marc Anthony
15. “Adios” – Ricky Martin
16. “Javier El de Los Llanos” – Calibre 50 (#6 RegMex)
17. “Perdon” – Camila
18. “El Agüitado” – Jorge Valenzuela (#5 RegMex)
19. “Tenerte” – Luis Coronel (#8 RegMex) (Quite a plummet for young Coronel! You hate to see that.)
20. “Lo Poco Que Tengo” – Ricardo Arjona

21. “Como Yo Le Doy” – Pitbull ft. Don Miguelo
22. “Tu Respiracion” – Chayanne
23. “Cuando Nos Volvamos a Encontrar” – Carlos Vives ft. Marc Anthony
24. “Llegaste Tu” – Luis Fonsi ft. Juan Luis Guerra
25. “Eres Una Niña” – Gerardo Ortíz (#19 RegMex) (Hooray!)

——

#7. “Ahora Por Ley” – Los Huracanes Del Norte
#9. “Soy Un Desmadre” – Banda Tierra Sagrada ft. Marco Flores & La #1 Banda Jerez
#10. “Asi Ya No” – La Maquinaria Norteña

#11. “La Historia De Mis Manos” – Banda Carnaval
#12. “Zapatillas Ferragamo” – Meno Lugo
#13. “Mi Padrino El Diablo” – La Trakalosa De Monterrey
#14. “Mi Princesa” – Remmy Valenzuela
#15. “Levantando Polvadera” – Voz De Mando
#16. “No Me Dolio” – La Original Banda el Limón
#17. “La Indicada” – Kevin Ortíz
#18. “Al Estilo Mafia” – Saul El Jaguar ft. La Bandononona Clave Nueva de Max Peraza
#20. “El Karma” – Ariel Camacho y Los Plebes Del Rancho

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